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Points for Asthma


#1

Treating a patient for Asthma tomorrow and wondering if you would have any advised points.

It effects him during activity such as sports. also it effects him in the morning.

Hes also sufferring from constant exhaustion. Basically always feeling wrecked tired with no energy. Feeling lethargic.

What points could i use? and would i tonify or disperse. He doesnt have any feeling of phlegm either.

I presume id be tonifying on all sides? seems like a deficient case!?

Any help would be great?


#2

Start with our acupuncture for asthma treatment guide. If you have further questions or are not getting the results you desire, please comment on this topic with what your diagnosis is and what you have tried - along with what has changed and what hasn't in the patient.


#3

i apologize because i was too lazy to write it all out so i've pasted parts of my graduation thesis for you, i hope it helps


According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, Xiao-Chuan is divided into two sections; the periods between attacks, and the periods during attacks. Attacks occur when the Lung is unable to downbear and disperse Qi, and the Kidney is unable to absorb the Qi. Therefore because the Qi cannot be regulated it counter flows upwards, and coughing and panting ensue. The periods during attacks are again divided into two sections; attacks which are generated by heat, and attacks which are generated by cold. Typically heat Xiao-Chuan is related to menstruation and where the Liver becomes deficient and Qi becomes stagnated.


Phlegm is central to the pathology of Xiao-Chuan in where phlegm obstructs the airways. The producer of phlegm is the Spleen, and the Spleen is the mother of the Lung where the phlegm is stored. When the Spleen is deficient, there will be failure to move and transform fluids. When fluids cease flowing they will collect and transform to dampness. In concurrence with this factor, if the dampness remains untreated, it will congeal and transform to phlegm.


Therefore the pathology of a deficient Spleen as it pertains to the production of phlegm and its role in Xiao-Chuan is as follows. During the periods between attacks, although the sufferer has a predisposing Spleen deficiency, the Spleen deficiency is not as apparent and the sufferers’ genuine Qi is capable of supplementing for the deficient Spleen albeit though somewhat tenuously. This allows for amounts of phlegm to be generated and settle deep into the Lungs and remain hidden there. Depending on how much phlegm has been stored in the Lung, will determine whether or not the sufferer will portray any signs or symptoms of airway hindrance. The phlegm will remain hidden deep in the Lungs, until it is stirred up by some other disease mechanism which then will cause the phlegm to stir and rise up where it will block the airways preventing the Lungs from dispersing Qi. This in turn will affect the deficient Spleen even more, which will then cause more dampness and ultimately more phlegm.


Having said this we then need to look at what is the other disease mechanism that has stirred up the hidden phlegm. It is wind. For wind to have the ability to affect the body it must be able to invade and suppress the sufferers Wei-Qi or defensive Qi. The two viscera that play the main role in the defensive Qi are the Lung and Kidney. The Lung has the duty of spreading Wei-Qi to the skin and muscles, and when the Lung is deficient; the ability to spread the Wei-Qi to the skin and muscles becomes impaired. This will result in the interstices becoming loose and flaccid. These loose interstices will present an easy haven for external pathogens and will ultimately result in a greater invasion capability of any exterior pathogenic factors. The Kidney is the root of all Qi including Wei-Qi. When the Kidney is deficient all Qi becomes impaired. This will result in an impaired Wei-Qi being dispersed by the Lung to the skin and muscles and once again causing the same effect on the interstices, which will once again result in a greater invasion capability of any exterior pathogenic factor.


Therefore in terms of creating the appropriate environment for the Xiao-Chuan disease to exist, and also for an attack to occur; certain conditions in the body must have already taken place. This is because the aetiology and pathogenesis of Xiao-Chuan relies on three main factors; firstly the deficiency of the Defensive QI, and secondly the attack of wind and finally the existence of hidden phlegm. With this understanding I am now able to submit my finding that all sufferers of Xiao-Chuan must have a pre-existing deficiency of the Kidney, Spleen, and Lung to various degrees, a weak defensive qi, and hidden phlegm.


According to Traditional Chinese Medicine philosophy, the treatment principal for Xiao-Chuan is as follows:


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a. If Kidney qi is not absorbed, then supplement the Kidney’s


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b. <font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">If there is a deficiency below and excess above, then downbear counterflow and flush phlegm</font>


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c. <font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">If dual deficiency of qi and yin, then supplement qi and nourish yin</font>


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d. <font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">If yang deficiency is causing flooding, then warm yang, Tonify Spleen, and remove damp</font>


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According to TCM philosophy the general acupuncture points that are used for Xiao-Chuan are as follows:


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e.


Principle points: Zhongfu (lu1), Kongzhui(lu6), Feishu(bl13), Dingchuan(ex-b1), Tiantu(ren22), Tanzhong(ren17)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

f.


If cold in the Lung add Taiyuan(lu9), Fengmen(bl12)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

g.


If retention of Lung heat then add Dazhui(du14), Fenglong(st40)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

h.


If qi deficiency then add Pishu(bl20), Zusanli(st36), Qihai(ren6)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

i.


If Yin deficiency then add Shenshu(bl23), Taixi(kd3), Guanyuan(ren4), Sanyinjiao(sp6)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

j.


If Yang deficiency then add Shenshu(bl23), Qihai(ren6), Guanyuan(ren4), Neiguan(pe6)<font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma"><font color="#7f7f7f" size="2" face="Tahoma">

k.


In terms of the manipulation of the needles, for deficiency syndromes it is a tonification manipulation, and in excess syndromes it is a reduction method. For example if a patient presented with diagnosis of Asthma due to Qi deficiency, we would use a tonification manipulation for this patient. Points we could use are Zhongfu (tonification), Tanzhong (tonification), Zusanli (tonification), and Qihai (tonification). Having said this however, age and constitution are very important issues to consider when contemplating manipulation. For example, a patient presents with Asthma due to an excess syndrome, however this patient is an elderly person, or of a weak constitution; in this case it would most definitely be not advisable to use a reduction method. This is because the incorporation of a reducing method in this circumstance would drain the already depleted patient even more. In these kinds of cases there is no manipulation of needles, and the needle is retained in the body for a shorter amount of time. This method is called an even method.</font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></font></dir></dir>







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