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How can you protect your energy as a practitioner?


#1

I am a shiatsu practioner and a newbie acupuncturist. Two weeks ago I did about 4 shiatsu per day. Then I had to travel for a seminar on the weekend. I didnt eat well. Wind, cold and dampness got into my neck, shoulder and upper back at night. My energy drained. I could not move my legs or open my eyes. I felt asleep. I slept for 2 days. I got also cold upper back and easily got tired. I had a western medical checkup and found nothing. I felt tired, my gastrocnemious (BL) and tendons (LI11), SP6 (dampness), LU1, GV14, T1, T3, T6 (left side) hurt. The symptoms were getting better at morning (yang) and getting worse at night (yin). Also I had a lot of wind in my intestines.

My pulse was surface, thin. My tongue surface was white.

After practice I ate a lot but I could not replenish my energy. I live at Corfu island, Greece and It is raining almost non stop one month already. Today air dampness was 90%. As a result I got anxious also coz cold didnt got away and I had this breathing discomfort and heaviness in my lungs. I had to postpone all meetings. I know this is the period of Lung.

Then my stomach (CV 14, CV 15) made a knot and my hand palms got sweat.

I used cupping once and eukalyptus oil massage 3 times per day to take cold away and tonify the yang. I drunk hot water with ginger and honey. I used eukalyptus leaves steam for opening the nose and throat. I used P6, HT7, SI3, Yintang, CV17 for relax the mind. LI4, LV3. ST36 for tonify legs energy. Use of CV4 just needle without moxa made me more weak. SP9 for dampnes. I had remarkable results I gained my power in just one week but stomach - diaphragm knot like the one you get when your girlfriend goes away remained.

I have some things to discuss.

1. How can I protect my energy as a healer in general. Any acupuncture points that closes the opens so you dont lose energy so easy. What do you do?

2. How can TCM explain how dampness and cold affect the diaphragm and breathing. Where is the insufficiency?

3. How can I drop the stomach - diaphragm knot?

4. How do you fight the wind in the intestines that occur at night LI (05:00-07:00) time?

5 . I tried some points to remove the weight in my chest but I had no fast results.

Thanks,

I wish you a healthy winter.


#2


1. How can I protect my energy as a healer in general. Any acupuncture points that closes the opens so you dont lose energy so easy. What do you do?



-- Practice Tai Chi every day. And generally don&#39t treat yourself for all but the most minor of complaints. Get regular treatment from someone else. You will not have energy issues if you keep it strong with Tai Chi and regular treatment - perhaps some regular moxa on ST 36 during the cooler/winter months.



2. How can TCM explain how dampness and cold affect the diaphragm and breathing. Where is the insufficiency?



Dampness can be internal or external - internal generally from SP Qi Deficiency and external from the environment via weak Wei Qi. The lungs prefer moistness and both dryness (in autumn, hot/dry climates) and dampness (wet climates, weak spleen) will harm breathing.





3. How can I drop the stomach - diaphragm knot?



Again I would get treated from someone else (which isn&#39t a skill issue, it&#39s just hard to clearly look at signs when you look at yourself...). Generally, however, moxibustion on CV 12, CV 6 and/or ST 36 (particularly as it arose from weakness/dampness).



4. How do you fight the wind in the intestines that occur at night LI (05:00-07:00) time?



Control your diet and strengthen your sp qi via the above listed methods.



5 . I tried some points to remove the weight in my chest but I had no fast results.



Again, don&#39t treat yourself and practice Tai Chi which over time will make your body stronger and give you a better hold on controlling and moving your own energy.


#3


Looks like you catch a wind cold energy into your body. for wind cold flu, you can use points Du16, Ub12, Gb20, Lu7, Li4. Question one, to protect your energy first is close four gates(Li4 & Lv3), during your shiatsu treatment, prevent the sick energy go to your body from the patient, you must meditate close those 4 points, it is hard to say how to do it, you need practise. Question two, in TCM, the wind is leader of every sick energy, it can mix with dampness or cold or heat go into your body. Question three, use points Ub17, Ren12 etc. may helpful. Question four, at night people very easy catch cold with open door or window sleep, you can close door or window or change sleep direction avoid the wind energy. Question five: do you mean chest stuffy? the points Lv3 is useful.


#4


I have to agree with Chad, even as a practitioner it is not a good idea to try treating yourself.





I also recommend chi kung which keep your chi in the meridians circulating as well as helps removing stagnation caused by deseases. Like Chad recommended, Tai Chi is also a great option. You should learn either of these and practice as much as you possibly can. I am a long time chi kung practitioner as well as teach privately. Chi kung is most effective when done twice a day (once in the morning and once in the evening) but of course most people nowadays don&#39t have time for that.





Learn any of these methods and definitely seek the advice or another acupuncturist for treatment.


#5


At the risk of sounding unimaginative, I agree with Chad and Blade that you should really see another acupuncturist. Why expect less for yourself than you do your clients? We all know the resorative and preventitive powers of regular acupuncture. If you can see it as a vital part of your practice, then it might make more sense for you to do this. Besides, it is never a good idea for anyone in any discipline to self - treat beyond minor ailments, and in a job like ours where we give so much to the patients, interacting with their qi on a daily basis, it stands to reason our own qi will become affected. Another &#39eye&#39 would see what you don&#39t as well as give something to you, to help replenish your overworked systems. Therapists, social workers, nurses and some clever doctors (not many) understand this and have regular debriefing/reflective/relaxation sessions as part of their working life to help balance the demands of working with people. Besides, how are you ever going to reach some of the points, like Back-shu, which might be just what you need right now?! LOL.


#6


Another way to maintain energy is to tap in to active energy sources. Energy depletion is a problem for new Tong Ren (TR) healers, but when TR is done in a group format everyone can connect to the collective unconscious and receive energy or at least energy stimulation. This idea may apply to all group activities that have a strong focus. Thus, energy may be available by meditating while your favorate soccer team is playing to access fan energy. Being present at the game is not necessary. The same energy source might be available during religious services. Just try meditating on Christ on Christmass Day. Reiki practice employs a universal energy source that is supposed to be unlimited. Generally, Reiki also uses the idea that the energy knows where to go. So tapping into an energy source could help to heal internal problems without having to even identify them.



I confess to not being encumbered by a formal education in healing. Nor do I have a great sensitivity to energy. But I have developed the opinion that energy work is part of many aspects of our lives. I think that healers may be best served by taking a multi-discipline approach, at least in terms of energy concepts. IMO, our energy fields and connections are controlled by different mental activiites including religion, spirituality, philosophy, emotions, intent and even symbol recognition. I consider all of these practices to be modalities of energy work. Also consider managing your own energy by how you participate in these mental activities.



Enjoy, DaveG


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